APRIL 21-23, 2020

BOSTON, MA USA

The Official Blog of the Annual Translational Microbiome Conference

The official blog of the Annual Translational Microbiome Conference provides readers with information, insight and analysis regarding the microbiome.

Tailoring Microbiome Interventions: The Intersection of Precision Medicine and the Microbiome

By Carrie Brodmerkel, Senior Director, Systems Pharmacology & Biomarkers, Janssen R&D

The microbiome gets a lot of press these days, from leading scientific journals such as Science publishing a special issue “Microbiota at Work” in April, 1 to articles about fecal microbiome transplants in major newspapers like the Washington Post.2 Many articles tout the need for a healthy gut microbiome and that the diversity of the gut microbiome is what maintains not just gut health but overall health. But for all of the hype, what do we really know about what a healthy microbiome looks like? What do we really know about the impact of the microbiome on health and disease? Is there a universal definition of a healthy microbiome or is it more likely that the each person has his or her own unique healthy gut microbiome?

A study published in 2015 in Science Advances studied the fecal, oral and skin microbiome of an Amerindian tribe, the Yanomami, who were completely isolated from the Western world.3 The researchers found that the Yanomami had the highest levels of human microbial diversity ever reported. They also don’t suffer from Western diseases like cardiovascular and metabolic disease or autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Does this infer that gut microbial diversity equates to better health and less disease? That has not yet been proven and it may be that the microbiome in this tribe works in conjunction with a far different lifestyle and lack of chemical and pharmaceutical impacts and interventions to support a lack of disease. Still it drives the question of whether personalized cocktails of microbes will be needed to achieve optimal gut health for a given individual or group of individuals with similar microbiomes?

This collision of microbiome research and the precision medicine space, and the potential need for patient selection and personalization of microbiome therapies, will play out as microbial based therapeutics begin to hit the clinic. Evidence supporting this need already exists from fecal microbial transplant studies in C. difficile and inflammatory bowel disease where the response rates in an unselected population of patients leaves opportunity for improvement. Efforts to understand the functional effects of the microbes that inhabit the human gut and determining which promote health and which promote disease will be essential in unraveling the microbial communities necessary to promote health at the population or cohort level.

Hear more about Janssen’s efforts to define patient stratification strategies and personalized medicine in the age of microbial-based therapeutics at Arrowhead’s 3rd Annual Translational Microbiome Conference, being held April 12-13, 2017 in Boston, MA. For more information, visit: http://www.microbiomeconference.com

1 Science Magazine April 2016 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6285

2 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2016/04/28/scientists-think-theyve-found-the-secret-to-better-poop-transplants/?utm_term=.91f00d298c91

3 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/3/e1500183.

Interestingly, despite their isolation and no known exposure to antibiotics, it was found that the tribe harbored bacteria that carried functional antibiotic resistance genes, including those that confer resistance to synthetic antibiotics and are syntenic with mobilization elements.

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The University of Virginia School of Medicine, as accredited provider, awards 8 hours of participation (consistent with the designated number of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM ) to a participant who successfully completes this educational activity. The University of Virginia School of Medicine maintains a record of participation for six (6) years.

Shahram Lavasani, Ph.D.

Founder, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Scientific Officer
Immune Biotech

Profile coming soon.

Scott Jackson, Ph.D.

Group Leader, Complex Microbial Systems
NIST (National Institute of Standards & Technology

Profile coming soon.

Rachel Clemens, Ph.D.

Commerical Innovation Manager, Life Science Lead
ISS US National Lab, Center for Advancement in Science in Space

Profile coming soon.

Lynne Elmore, Ph.D.

Director, Translational Cancer Research Program
American Cancer Society

Lynne Elmore, PhD, is the director of the Translational Cancer Research program in the Extramural Grants department of the American Cancer Society (ACS). She manages a research portfolio focused on cell biology, infectious disease, the microbiome, molecular genetics, and cancer drug discovery.

Garth Ehrlich, Ph.D.

Professor of Microbiology & Immunology, Professor of Otolayngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Drexel University College of Medicine

Dr Ehrlich is Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Drexel University College of Medicine (DUCOM) in Philadelphia, PA, USA. Dr. Ehrlich is also the founder and director of three Research Centers of Excellence in the Institute for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Disease: the Center for Genomic Sciences (CGS); the Center for Advanced Microbial Processing (CAMP); and the Center for Surgical Infections and Biofilms.

He also directs Drexel University’s Core Genomics Facility and the Meta-Omics Shared Resource for the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center – an NCI-designated Cancer Center.

Momo Vuyisich, Ph.D.

Chief Scientific Officer
Viome

Momo Vuyisich is a co-founder and Chief Science Officer at Viome, a data-driven personalized nutrition company. Momo provides scientific leadership at Viome and his vision is to revolutionize healthcare from "symptoms management" to a true preventative medicine. He leads product development, clinical test implementation, and comprehensive clinical research portfolio.

Momo is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of New Mexico and New Mexico Tech. Before co-founding Viome in 2016, Momo spent 12 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he led the Applied Genomics team, which developed the core technology used by Viome today.

Nancy Caralla

Founding President, Executive Director
C Diff Foundation

Nancy C Caralla is a three-time Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) survivor. She has accumulated over 25 years of experience in the nursing profession blended with over 30 years in international construction management. Over the past several years, Nancy, in partnership with C Diff Foundation members, has focused on raising C. difficile awareness through education and advocating for Clostridium difficile infection prevention, treatments, clinical trials, AMR, and environmental safety worldwide. The C Diff Foundation is a non-profit organization that takes great pride in its volunteers, chairpersons, and committees.

Rachel Teitelbaum, Ph.D.

Chief Executive Officer
Hervana

Profile coming soon.

Sonia Timerlake, Ph.D.

Vice President of Research
Finch Therapeutics

Dr. Sonia Timberlake is the VP of Research at Finch Therapeutics, a microbiome therapeutics company. Sonia is an expert at designing NGS-based algorithms for applications in microbial genomics, immunogenomics, and evolution. Prior to joining Finch, she built and managed AbVitro's computational algorithms and infrastructure, supporting high throughput single-cell immune phenotyping and repertoire sequencing technology. This technology platform was acquired by Juno Therapeutics, where Sonia led a multidisciplinary team to harness native adaptive immune responses for developing engineered cell therapies in oncology.

Dae-Wook Kang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
University of Toledo

Profile coming soon.

Sameer Sonkusale, Ph.D.

Prof. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Prof. of Biomedical Engineering (adjunct), Director/Principal Investigator, Nano Lab
Tufts University

Profile coming soon.

Amy Feehan, Ph.D.

Research Scientist
Ochsner Health System

Dr. Feehan is an early stage investigator who received her BS and PhD in Neuroscience from The Brain Institute at Tulane University in New Orleans. She has conducted research in humans and rodents covering topics ranging from drug development of novel endomorphin analogs for pain, to sleep and circadian rhythms research and most recently the gut-brain axis and infectious disease. Her doctoral work led to two patents for a compound that reverses both acute and chronic pain with no observable risk of addiction. She currently works as a research scientist in the Infectious Disease department at Ochsner in New Orleans designing and executing investigator-initiated clinical trials.